User Experience Design Portfolio

My work in User Experience Design encompasses wireframes, prototypes, flow diagrams, and visual design

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Wireframes for Website

At Franklin Templeton Investments, Jamie led the redesign of the company's retail website from the UX perspective. He created multiple iterations of wireframes, responding to business input, usability studies, and UX team input.

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Hand-drawn Wireframes

Sometimes Jamie will hand-draw wireframes for presenting concepts and discussing with project stakeholders, then create more refined wireframes for development.

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Concepting Sketches

These sketches were part of a discussion with a Business Analyst to determine the best approach for a particular request. Prior to generating a more refined Wireframe, these “throwaway” concepts helped to clarify an initial direction.

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Prototype Flow Scenarios

Jamie's wireframes and protoypes often include flow diagrams to help illustrate the user flow through a series of pages or use cases. These diagrams have proven helpful in conveying the system requirements to stakeholders.

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Style Guide UI Specifications

Jamie wrote most of the usability specs and guidelines for a major US retail website redesign. This included creating wireframes to illustrate design standards when necessary, as well as writing out the detailed descriptions of the guidelines. This sample shows a navigation spec for a four-level hierarchical navigation system.

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Medical Device Instructional Insert

This medical device had usability challenges and Jamie was on the team working to develop supporting instructional materials to mitigate the problems. The team conducted usability testing of the medical device with the supporting material.

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Process Diagram for Scientific Software

Jamie designed and created this “process diagram” as part of a series of educational screens to support user understanding of the sequence of events in a complex scientific application.

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Hotel Navigation Signage Design

Jamie was team lead and primary designer for creating navigational signage at a hotel for the 2006 Human Factors and Ergonomics Annual Meeting, a conference of over 1000 people. The signs used a “subway” metaphor to help orient visitors to the confusing hotel complex.

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Hotel Navigation Signage (on site)

The signage was printed in the conference packet and displayed prominently at key conference areas.